The Path to Parenthood, Part 2: Pregnancy

Welcome to the 2nd installment of our Path to Parenthood series!

by Kandace Cahill, DAOM, L.Ac., FABORM

This entry covers PREGNANCY, the good, the bad, the not-so-pretty. For many women, particularly those who visit our clinic, the long-awaited positive pregnancy test heralds a time of major achievement, one that often comes after a long and arduous path of ART. It is the quintessential, highly coveted, brass ring. However, it is rarely accompanied by the magical “Ahhhhh” feeling of accomplished relaxation that women expect to have at the moment the little pee strip turns +. On the contrary…this is a time of heightened anxiety, and sometimes fear, that after all the work—the ovulation tests, the morning temperatures, the oh-so-romantic “timed intercourse” (or even more romantic, the hot date with the fertility clinic), avoiding alcohol, avoiding caffeine, avoiding hot baths, and chocolate, and just about everything else that brings pleasure—that after all of this, it might not take.

And when is the magical time when you can let your breath out and trust that all is well?

And isn’t pregnancy a time when so many things can go wrong, too?

Where IS the magic of pregnancy, anyway? Read More

The Path to Parenthood, Part 1: FERTILITY

by Kandace Cahill, DAOM, L.Ac, FABORM

Welcome to our first installment of The Path to Parenthood—a collection of three special articles related to the most important times around mamahood: fertility, pregnancy and postpartum. In each of these short articles, we’re going to delve into these topics and talk about why Chinese medicine is an indispensable tool for improving outcomes, as well as answering many questions, dispelling myths and creating new awareness around self-care.

Our first topic is FERTILITY, which makes up a large percentage of what we treat at WWA. This is obviously the cornerstone of parenthood, as fertility challenges dictate our ability to create the families we desire. Unfortunately, these challenges are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide and assisted reproduction (such as IVF) has become BIG BUSINESS.

Read More

Treating Fertility with Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine

Treating Fertility with Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine
Treating Fertility with Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine

Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine has become a common therapy in treating infertility, and it is for good reason.

A recent podcast interview on Everyday Acupuncture explains why. In this episode, Dr Lorne Brown, an acupuncturist in Vancouver, BC and the creator of the “Acubalance Fertility Diet”, discusses the many aspects of health that relate to fertility. As Dr. Brown highlights, Chinese medicine looks at the body as a whole and can help couples conceive by addressing the root cause of infertility, which improves the “take-home baby” rate. In other words, the healthier the mom, the healthier the child.
In this podcast, Dr. Brown explains the specifics of how acupuncture can improve fertility. 4 key areas are discussed:
  1. Acupuncture can help increase blood flow to the uterus and ovaries. In order to have this effect, most research suggests treatment twice a week for at least 4 weeks.
  2. Acupuncture helps reduce stress hormones. When we are stressed, our bodies revert to the “fight or flight” mode. During “fight or flight”, the body shifts into survival mode, and less energy is available for making babies.
  3. Acupuncture helps balance hormones. Many women don’t realize that an egg takes nearly 3 months to fully mature. In order to get the best quality egg, a woman should be treated for at least 3 months prior to natural conception, IUI, or IVF.
  4. Studies have shown that acupuncture increases live birth rates when used with IVF.
Dr. Brown stresses the importance of “nourishing the soil before planting the seed”.  Chinese Medicine’s unique approach to viewing the body as a whole allows trained acupuncturists to see where imbalances lie and then treat the root of these imbalances. As a result, fertility improves and many other symptoms may improve as well, from digestive issues to mood and sleep quality.
Click here  to listen to the full podcast.
Article by Stephanie Duininck, L.Ac., Well Woman Acupuncture Education Outreach